Bookmakers


#1681

Looks like you’ve punted on a bent match there mate, either inadvertently or judging by the big stake and nature of the match, on purpose. I don’t know what your rights are now. This isn’t a bet on a horse they have rescinded the money on, but rather something unsavory. When they say the matter has been referred to a third party then i suspect they mean some kind of match fixing regulatory body. I suspect anyone that placed a similar bet to you they will withhold payment until an investigation is conducted, could be weeks or months. If there were 50 more guys like you then why would you make it easy for these people to pocket maybe €100k in total and walk off into the sunset to do it again? They will want to make it as awkward as possible for you now, and rightly so IMO. You haven’t placed an innocent bet here have you? I’d be surprised if you can get any future bets on with them on that account for anything more than buttons. You will get accounts closed right, left and centre with this approach. But then i suspect you know that.


#1682

And what’s the good news mate? @Copper_pipe is having a bad run but I suspected that he was following a bad crowd with the gambling all along :hushed:


#1683

No wonder she left him.


#1684

The good news is he can choose to have his bet voided if he wants and get his stake back


#1685

And if this match turns out to have been fixed is there any way he might become a figure of interest to the authorities in how he came by the information?


#1686

Why do you ask?


#1687

Because I don’t know about those things, if an investigation was to take place you’d wonder how far they’d spread the net in the search for information


#1688

Just came across this. Similar type of thing to @Copper_pipe situation as described yesterday. I think if you find yourself in the thick of successful bets in matches like this then you can’t expect quick and consequence free payment. I am no defender of Betway, i have had an account closed by them myself and also a shadow account i set up in a family members name went too, but you can’t call them cunts for not paying out on incidents of match fixing. I have more right (and people similar to me have more right) to call them cunts when i am only betting on horses and GAA, using my wit over theirs. The playing field is level as possible, and probably tilted in their favour. You have to shrug your shoulders as it is the way the whole thing has gone, none of them will lay bets to who they deem sharp/intelligent/selective punters. But what you are meddling in is a different story @Copper_pipe and you won’t get any sympathy from me when you come here with your tales of woe like yesterday.

Suspicious betting activity placed on a 9 November friendly between Armenia and Belarus has been confirmed by anti match-fixing organisation Federbet, according to industry reports. It is understood that during the game, many bets were placed that there would be more than three goals in the match, which remained at 0-0 until 41 minutes, but finished 4-1 to Armenia.

http://www.sportsintegrityinitiative.com/sports-integrity-briefs-14-november-2017/


#1689

Screenshot_20171124-010758|281x500
!

Paddy Power is due a COTY nomination


#1690

#1691

Found the highlights on Youtube :joy:

No word on the investigation…


#1692

New Jersey bringing a case to the US Supreme Court to legalize gambling on Monday.


#1693

Sopranos


#1694

Jaysus the Aussies love their Pokies.

FT article today says the Australians lose on Average €911 per person per year gambling!!!

We are third on the list, at about €500.

UK about €300.

If you think about what a nation of degenerates we are, and then basically double it, that’s the Ozzies.


#1695

That’s phenomenal. No wonder Paddy Power were balls out trying to get in there.

I indirectly knew two Irish lads in Oz who were addicted to the Pokies. One of them was very bad and used to be sneaking off at all hours of the day under false pretences to go play them.


#1696

Any link/Screenshot of Article?


#1697

Australia is the gambling capital of the western world, where punters spend more per head than anywhere else on earth. But as Ireland’s Rekindling crossed the line to win Tuesday’s 157th running of the Melbourne Cup — one of the world’s richest horse races — bookmakers warn the party is over for the industry.

_“There are tough times ahead with the introduction of new point of consumption taxes and advertising rules,” says Cormac Barry, chief executive of Sportsbet, one of Australia’s largest wagering companies. “This is an earthquake — a seismic event for the industry.” _

Gambling is an A$23bn ($17.7bn) a year business Down Under, where having a flutter on the horses, playing the pokies (poker machines) in pubs or visiting a casino is part of everyday life for many. Australian adults lose on average €911 per year on gambling — placing them at the top of the global league table in terms of spending on betting.

Poker machines eat up about half the annual spending but a boom on online wagering, which is an A$1.4bn a year industry, has attracted many of the world’s biggest bookmakers to Australia. Sportsbet is owned by Paddy Power Betfair while William Hill, Bet 365 and Ladbrokes Coral have all rushed to establish Australian units to chase local punters.

_But a combination of cash-strapped state administrations and concerns about problem gambling has created a political backlash against gambling operators, who face higher taxes and changes to a light-touch regulatory regime. _

In July, the state of South Australia introduced a 15 per cent consumption tax on net wagering revenues or gambling losses on bookmakers. Western Australia will follow suit on January 1, and other states are expected to follow.

The tax, which is modelled on a similar UK levy, is designed to reverse a slide in betting tax collection caused by an influx of foreign bookmakers, who base themselves in low-tax locations.

_Sportsbet has warned that its pre-tax profits, which were A$175m in the financial year to July, could halve if the consumption tax is introduced across Australia. Other smaller operators in Australia such as William Hill, Bet 365 and Ladbrokes have racked up significant losses since entering the market. _

_“It will be a catalyst for further consolidation,” says Mr Barry. _

The racing industry, which depends on bookmakers for a large slice of its own revenues, is concerned the levy could dent its finances and its ability to host world class events such as the Melbourne Cup.

“It depends on how the tax is implemented by each state and this is not yet understood,” says Giles Thompson, chief executive of Racing Victoria.

“We want to ensure the racing and thoroughbred industry is not worse off.”

_But in another blow to the bookmaking industry, anti-gambling activists have stepped up their lobbying activities to overturn what they claim is a light-touch regulatory regime. _

“Gambling is Australia’s blind spot, just like guns are in the US, and until Australia’s political business and media elites start treating gambling like tobacco, record levels of harm will continue to occur,” says Tim Costello of the Alliance for Gambling Reform, a lobby group.

Canberra recently passed new media laws to prevent bookmakers advertising on television during live sports events and before 8.30pm. The crackdown follows controversy caused by television networks inviting bookmakers on to sports shows to provide live odds before matches.

_Draft rules banning gambling operators from offering free bets, credits or other financial inducements to entice customers to open online betting accounts were recently agreed between state and federal ministers. _

But while politicians have shown a willingness to tackle the bookmaking industry, critics say they have failed to tackle the lucrative poker machine industry, which is one of the largest donors to Australian politics.

“The most obvious move is $1 maximum bets on pokies,” says Stephen Mayne, a local government councillor and campaigner for gambling reform. “But a tobacco-style ban on gambling advertising would also help.”

https://www.ft.com/content/b34c6794-13d8-3757-8f47-43b10eb01a6c

There’s a chart that goes with it that I can’t paste in for some reason that sets out how much per person was spent in 2016.

I can’t see the exact amounts on it but it’s roughly;
Oz €911
Singapore €590
Ireland €500
Finland €430
US, NZ, Canada €400
Italy €380
Norway €370
UK €300


#1698

sounds like horseshit that we lose €500 on pokies


#1699

Not on pokies, gambling in general.


#1700

Hell of alot more than that!!