Jeremy Corbyn he's in the RA


#121

They are going after the Limerick vote


#122

It’s an anti-semitic conspiracy by the Jews


#123

Momentum of course is an anti-semitic conspiracy, founded as it was by a Jew.


#124

I thought Momentum wasn’t Labour?


#125

There are two things here which need to be viewed seperately.

  1. Should the labour party actually represent the lower classes it’s supposed to
  2. Or should they continue to be Tory-lite in the hopes of regaining power at all costs

I would say that the labour party does not need to be in power in order to better serve its supposed core demographic of working class, lower middle class voters.If they move to the left it will naturally drag the Tories more towards the centre. What has happened in recent years is as they have tried to win power they’ve chased the Tories to the right and left the Tories to persue their trickle down policies to their hearts content and even advocated them when they were in power. Now they can create a new narrative that this isn’t working and force a reconsideration of the countries direction.
They need to fuck the blairites out of the party and stick with a core who actually believe in the Labour parties supposed ideology. Corbyn has the mandate now. The rest need to get on board or fuck off.
I don’t necessarily believe that a more left wing labour are unelectable either, but even if they are it’s no bad thing to have a proper party protecting the working men and women as opposed to protecting the elite.


#126

He seemingly observed a minute silence back in 1987 for the IRA murder gang that the SAS stopped in their tracks at Loughall.

Speaking of the IRA in 1987, kidnap victim John O’Grady, the Dublin dentist who had his fingers chopped off by an IRA thug in 1987 was buried on Saturday round about the same time Corbyn was re-affirmed as Labour Leader.


#127

that’s a lie


#128

a lie


#129

Corbyn terrifies the British establishment. Smear after smear is being heaped on him by the right wing British press. If they thought he was so useless and unelectable surely they would leave him be? George Eaton, political editor of New Statesman, is the latest journalist to be caught telling porkies about Jeremy.


#130

Sorry but that is a load of tosh.

You need to get elected in order to do anything. “Blairite” scum might be the order of the day for the insurgents into the Labour Party and older members might think the party went too far to the centre, but in terms of “left” thinking policies/aspirations of the left, the Blair/Brown Governments did a lot.

  • a minimum wage, intolerable for the Tories
  • he took one million pensioners out of “poverty”. I would argue what poverty actually is but it is an aspiration of the left nonetheless
  • they did a Charlie and introduced free bus travel for OAPs
  • increased Child Benefit
  • increased literacy
  • increased money into public services
  • employment was high for a sustained period with the Goverment giving it a leg up when “needed”
  • Devolution of parts of the U.K.
  • banned Fox Hunting
  • the Human Rights Act

Would these have been done under the Conservatives?

Brown/Blair did what was done in Ireland. They got cosy with busy and rode the tax they brought in. The misgivings over this by a minority of members at the time, the general disenchantment worldwide with “Big Business” both combined with his legacy in Iraq has made him toxic and seemingly the whole New Labour project as well.

Britain is a First Past the Post system. In Ireland, it is far easier to effect change from the sidelines as even the smallest party can regularly find themselves in Government. The Liberals problem in the UK for years was that once they lost their grip on the progressive vote, they started to milk votes from single issue voters. Once they got into Government, a once in a generation opportunity in the UK for them, when the inevitability of government compromise came in, those voters left them high and dry.

What exactly did the Labour Party achieve in the 1980s being on the outside, with loony platforms the likes of which Michael Foot put forward in 1983?

Despite the Tories now being a total mess and Europe still damaging them, they have a free ride for the next few years. Corbyn at PMQs hasn’t even asked a question on Brexit. When the Grammar School thing started a few weeks back, he missed the opportunity to ask about it the first time back. It was only the week after that he got around to it. If you watch the Vice documentary (made by a Corbyn fan) you will see a rabble at the top of the party who are totally ineffective. Owen Jones, who was a key reason why Corbyn got so much buzz from the social media flutters and is a big time leftie, asked questions over Corbyn’s leadership a couple of months ago. Despite being Corbyn’s biggest cheerleader last year, he was immediately attacked by the cult following Corbyn has as a traitor (https://medium.com/@OwenJones84/questions-all-jeremy-corbyn-supporters-need-to-answer-b3e82ace7ed3#.i12n8x5ph).

And before Sidney comes in to go on about disloyalty, can I ask him which MP voted against the Labour Government the most in the Blair/Brown years?


#131

This is an London School of Economics study of media representations of Corbyn - the conclusion is very revealing:

Journalistic Representations of Jeremy Corbyn in the British Press

Article below is by one the co-authors of the study:


#132

Check the polls, the chap is a dead duck. I posted a long form of polling since 2010 a while ago and Corbyn is underperforming Miliband by 5-6 points roughly on average.

In the world of the Corbyn cult, it is all the media. Owen Jones asks some questions about Corbyn? He’s a traitor.

The Tories barely have to do anything with Corbyn/McDonnell as they are such a rabble. McDonnell would actually be a decent leader and he wants the job, but he knows he doesn’t have a hope of ever getting the nomination required. So they are all backing Corbyn now, despite him not being leadership material, as it is the only hope for the hard left to get on top of British politics.


#133

There was just a fleeting reference to the “trauma” suffered by dentist John O’Grady when family, friends, colleagues and patients packed the Star of the Sea Church in Sandymount, Dublin yesterday for his funeral Mass.

The celebrant, Fr John McDonagh, said the “world knew the trauma he suffered, but he never spoke about it and got on with the job and his creative acceptance of life.”

The only other link to the terrible events of 1987, when he was kidnapped and had two fingers cut off by terrorist Dessie O’Hare, was another of the celebrants at his funeral Mass, Fr Brian D’Arcy, who acted as an intermediary for his then father-in-law, Dr Austin Darragh, during the kidnap drama.

The well-known dentist, who died on Tuesday at the age of 67, after a two-year battle with cancer, was remembered as a sports-loving father and friend to almost everybody he met. One of the class of 1966 at Clongowes Wood College, he built a large dentistry practice and worked in the Blackrock Clinic until illness prevented him.

Last month, he walked his daughter Louise down the aisle when she became the last of his children to marry.

His brother Willie said that he was known as ‘Long John Silver Tooth’ during his rugby days because he’d had a tooth knocked out and his father, also a dentist, insisted on him wearing a silver cap to protect his other teeth.

As well as being honorary dentist to the Irish rugby team for many years, John O’Grady continued to play the game with the UCD Hogs in ‘golden oldie’ competitions.

“He was a gentle man, he acquired friends like bees make honey,” said his younger brother. “He was probably the only dentist in the world people looked forward to going to see.”

A reflection written by his partner, Rachel Fehily, a barrister and playwright, was read by Fr McDonagh.

“He was an inspirational father figure to my two boys Harvey and Jack,” she said.

“John’s illness gave us an opportunity to express how we felt about each other in a different way. Little things that might have annoyed us, like how he loaded the dishwasher, became trivial, as they always should have been”, while pleasures such as swimming in the sea together “became very precious”. The thing she learned most from John was “we should treat everyone around us with kindness, care and consideration”.

The other celebrants at the funeral were Fr Bruce Bradley, Fr Michael Sheil, Fr Noel Barber and Fr David Coghlan from Clongowes Wood College and Fr Pat Carroll.

John O’Grady was cremated at a private ceremony. He is survived by his partner Rachel, his children Darragh, Anthony and Louise and their mother Marise.


#134

Can I ask you for an evaluation of the media’s performance in relation to Corbyn, mate?

I know you’re big into your conspiracies about media being “left-wing” without ever having once backed up your bluster.

The problem is that your view, like on so many other subjects, would appear to be in no way related to reality.

Have you read the LSE study I posted above?


#135

The more sane members of the Labour party need to let things run their course now. Its the longest suicide note in history, round two. Let Corbyn at it, suffer the annihilation that’s coming at the next election and once Corbyn is jettisoned then, rebuild from there. Its essentially Michael Foot 1983 happening all over again.


#136

What’s the story with the constituency boundaries being redrawn in GB Geoff? Am I right in saying Corbyn has said all Labour MPs will have to be selected again by local committees? It will give him a great chance to purge the party of the Blairites.


#137

Islington North is seemingly going to disappear. When it comes to footballing matters, Corbyn is a Woolwich supporter. Says it all really.


#138

Is which football team a politician supports an important issue for you?


#139

Not necessarily but it can tell a lot. Woolwich supporters tend to be a deluded lot on the whole.


#140

Politicans get lampooned, Labour ones particularly so. I would never claim that the Sun, the Telegraph or Daily Mail are pro Labour, the media in the US is different. However, one of the driving forces behind Corbyn was Owen Jones of the Guardian.

Are you saying that Ed Milliband wasn’t attacked?

I posted the polling graphs before. Milliband vs Corbyn. Corbyn has struggled in the 28-32 level. Milliband was consistantly in the 35-40 range.


You ignore it as it suits you to continue with your tin foil hat and hope that Labour don’t actually govern, and you can slag the Tories.

Someone like Jones mentioned above, criticised Corbyn’s leadership and plenty of Party lefties legged it from him as he is an inept leader, and all are branded traitors.