Alternative Schooling Models(Crotty and Fenway)

I can’t wait for the forum’s resident adolescent expert TAN to comment on this…

[quote=“FingalRaven, post: 785499, member: 80”]what the fuck?

this is your chance to shine on this forum and you arent grasping the opportunity[/quote]

Taking tips on child rearing from mac? FFS sake, thats like taking hair care and styling tips from me

[quote=“Mac, post: 785496, member: 109”]Yer man Colm O’Gorman is involved with them and anything he gets involved with us generally evil.

Secondly, my understanding of them is that basically the kids don’t have to do anything that the kids don’t want to do. There doesn’t seem to be any kind of authority within the schools which I don’t think is good practice as it shapes how a person thinks for the rest of their life. If someone grows up with little or no respect for authority I don’t think its a good thing. I’m sure there are studies saying this is good but that’s just my take on it. Obviously we’ve a history of schools going over the top to assert their authority so I think the balance is somewhere in the middle.

Finally, they call all their teachers by their first name I believe, seems plain weird.[/quote]

I’ve a good friend who has taught in both and much prefers educate together. Mainstream schools are consumed with religion and not enough science. In her educate together time she got to teach about the differences in sexuality, she is in a mainstream school now and if she mentioned gay or lesbian she would be nearly fired. It’s little things like that that go on to shape our minds kid. You’d rather they be beat to a pulp and institutionalized with Christian rhetoric?

Report out yesterday claimed that Irish kids are twice as unhappy in school than their European counterparts. I wonder why?!

:D:clap:

[quote=“Mac, post: 785496, member: 109”]Yer man Colm O’Gorman is involved with them and anything he gets involved with us generally evil.

Secondly, my understanding of them is that basically the kids don’t have to do anything that the kids don’t want to do. There doesn’t seem to be any kind of authority within the schools which I don’t think is good practice as it shapes how a person thinks for the rest of their life. If someone grows up with little or no respect for authority I don’t think its a good thing. I’m sure there are studies saying this is good but that’s just my take on it. Obviously we’ve a history of schools going over the top to assert their authority so I think the balance is somewhere in the middle.

Finally, they call all their teachers by their first name I believe, seems plain weird.[/quote]
Other than the first and last sentences I think you’ve been fed some lies there Mac.

[quote=“ChocolateMice, post: 785506, member: 168”]I’ve a good friend who has taught in both and much prefers educate together. Mainstream schools are consumed with religion and not enough science. In her educate together time she got to teach about the differences in sexuality, she is in a mainstream school now and if she mentioned gay or lesbian she would be nearly fired. It’s little things like that that go on to shape our minds kid. You’d rather they be beat to a pulp and institutionalized with Christian rhetoric?

Report out yesterday claimed that Irish kids are twice as unhappy in school than their European counterparts. I wonder why?![/quote]

What type of mainstream school? I thought a load of them had abandoned their religious focus to more of a world religion focus rather than catholic led.

Steiner, my hole tase. It’s based on the belief that kids should be allowed develop as they wish and they don’t believe in discipline. I’m all for self expression but discipline is a must.
Montessori is great in that it supposedly emphasises learning through play, focussing on relative concepts and context (understanding the world, i suppose). But these days most should be doing this. As with all schools, your kids will only be as good as the teacher/ system lets them be.
Private schooling is excellent for accountability and facilities and should be no problem for a man of your means.

[quote=“Juhniallio, post: 785578, member: 53”]Steiner, my hole tase. It’s based on the belief that kids should be allowed develop as they wish and they don’t believe in discipline. I’m all for self expression but discipline is a must.
[/quote]

Is this not what Educate Together is based on?

Your run of the mill national school. During her interview the priest, who gets to sit in, grilled her on how she would teach religion. I also house share with a teacher and he, a religious man too, and he said it is taught way too much and should be kept off the curriculum altogether.

[quote=“Juhniallio, post: 785578, member: 53”]Steiner, my hole tase. It’s based on the belief that kids should be allowed develop as they wish and they don’t believe in discipline. I’m all for self expression but discipline is a must.
Montessori is great in that it supposedly emphasises learning through play, focussing on relative concepts and context (understanding the world, i suppose). But these days most should be doing this. As with all schools, your kids will only be as good as the teacher/ system lets them be.
Private schooling is excellent for accountability and facilities and should be no problem for a man of your means.[/quote]
Not forgetting all the myths, legends and folk tales your child would learn in the Steiner school system and that they’d be accomplished basket weavers, potters etc. by their early teens

Mac has some funny views on things, but he’s bang in about the discipline.

Can’t see why calling the teachers by their first names is an issue though. It’s only old British colonialism tht created all these Mr, Sir, etc etc. we are all given names and they should be used accordingly. It also builds stronger bonds between people to use first names. A very important thing for kids and teachers (IMO) and I think allows for an easier understanding of authority, and a less fearful one.

Last year I had Aussie kids call me coach when teaching them gaelic, thought it was bizarre so I told them to call me Kev and asked why they did it, an apparently they are made so it at whatever school they web to, by the coach. That’s bullshit IMO and just some jump up thinking he’s in “Friday night lights”.

Community schooling is the way to go, it’s up to the parents to police them staying away from the wrong crowd. Builds a more rounded character than any other type if schooling I believe.

[quote=“Juhniallio, post: 785578, member: 53”]Steiner, my hole tase. It’s based on the belief that kids should be allowed develop as they wish and they don’t believe in discipline. I’m all for self expression but discipline is a must.
Montessori is great in that it supposedly emphasises learning through play, focussing on relative concepts and context (understanding the world, i suppose). But these days most should be doing this. As with all schools, your kids will only be as good as the teacher/ system lets them be.
Private schooling is excellent for accountability and facilities and should be no problem for a man of your means.[/quote]

at last, a coherent voice compared with the TFK dullards

its Oz mate…no matter where you send her she will be surrounded by vermon…

No.

Can I pull something from left field on this thread…

Who educated Polish kids and today young polish adults on the nutritional value of food and the benefits of regular exercise?

Why was this missed by the Irish education system and left to the advertising agencies for the food industry to educate us?

Did you not get taught about the food triangle? (Sponsored by Kelloggs)

We’ve put the little one down for an Educate Together but it remains to be seen whether she will get in. Serious demand for places in Dublin.

The idea of developing respect for your elders and peers through effective communication and mutual understanding rather than instilling fear and unreasonable boundaries appeals to me.

Calling teachers by their first name seems completely normal to me.

[quote=“Kinvara’s Passion, post: 785602, member: 686”]Can I pull something from left field on this thread…

Who educated Polish kids and today young polish adults on the nutritional value of food and the benefits of regular exercise?

Why was this missed by the Irish education system and left to the advertising agencies for the food industry to educate us?[/quote]

Ever spend much time in the polish food shops kp? A much higher percentage of pickled/salt dried stuff in comparison to here. Not exactly organic fare.
They have mastered the shit out of cabbage though.

Sounds like a breeding ground for spoiled little cunts.
I bet that Ben young fella in Fair City goes to one of them schools.

[quote=“The Runt, post: 785607, member: 181”]Sounds like a breeding ground for spoiled little cunts.
I bet that Ben young fella in Fair City goes to one of them schools.[/quote]

I’d rather my child be confident and open-minded than repressed by nuns