North Korea


#621

When it’s the country that killed 20% of your population half a century ago it might be a tad upsetting alright.


#622

Its more likely that all the nuclear bombs they tested there may have affected it, ever so slightly.


#623

Slightly perhaps. I reckon it was James Bond myself


#624

It’s not sudden. The North Koreans have had a an offer to eliminate their nuclear weapons programme on the table since 1994. The deal was that the US would stop threatening to destroy it.

It worked until the ‘Axis of Evil’ speech from Bush in 2002. Of course no one ever talks about it because the North Koreans are ‘crazy’ and that’s all there is to it.


#625

Kim Jong Un is proving to be a master of geopolitics, or at least the proxy for the real master of geopolitics in the world today. He has the US screaming like the snowflakes they are, the Japanese in all sorts (ironic, some history there apparently) and the South Koreans are now his Bff’s.
He proposes a de-nuclearised peninsula, the south Koreans will readily agree, the Japanese will shite themselves. It leaves the US in no mans land as they won’t readily agree to that, it makes them look weak, but if they refuse, then they’re killing off the peace that two small nations have fashioned for themselves. The colonial neoliberal oppressor of small nations.
This has the fingerprints of Xi Jinping all over it. A DPRK at peace with its neighbours and opened up, if only slightly to the world, less dependent on China, a PR victory for them as they are no longer the sponsor of a murderous regime (if only some other leaders would act the same way).
But more importantly, a reduction and eventual cessation of US millitary influence, assets (in particular the intrusive radar deployed under the amusing cover story of anti missile defence systems) . Xi Jinping plays the long game, thinks in terms of decades, not the next 5 minutes. This is his play, make no mistake. It’s utter genius.


#626

Indeed, once peace prevails it shows that Communism is great for a country.

I would suggest a little more nuance. Countries have wars and make up eventually. The counties where the US had the longer period of hostile relations in a Cold War perspective are Cuba and North Korea. What differentiates them from Russia, China and Vietnam?


#627

What a pile of wank


#628

Can you tell us please Tim as that post makes absolutely no sense.


#629

It makes plenty of sense if you take off the blinkers.

Moaning about the US past war with North Korea and the influence of the South and the US running excercises there is a childish look at this.

Countries normalise relations after wars. The real reason why the US have not had any prolonged period of normalization with those two countries is the existence of autocratic dynasties backed up by a military elite. At least in the likes of Russia and China there were reevaluations of previous Communist regimes over time. Whilst not democratic, the systems allowed for a change of power. In Cuba and North Korea you have family dynasties which are rigid and difficult to move on in terms of international relations.

Given the adulation one of those families is held in by the left in the West, it is no surprise that you can’t think of this as a reason why relations have been so poor for a sustained period of time.


#630

Yeah, the Saudi’s have been making eyes at the yanks for years with little or no succ…never mind


#631

Did they have a direct confrontation?

I am not talking about the US dealing with authoritarians.

We all know they do that, that is remedial stuff.

I am talking about the reasons why NK and Cuba relations have been so fraught for so long. Countries have wars. They then try and patch things up. When you have the egos of a cultist family who are autocrats it is a different story.


#632

90% of NK trade is with China, so I would say the biggest factor was China enforcing UN sanctions, something they had voted for before but never implemented. Kim may be crazy but he’s not stupid, and ultimately what he wants is a regime like China, economic growth but still maintain total control.


#633

I’m still not seeing your rather tenuous point Tim.
Why is it that when Cuba and America attempt to normalise relations the neo cons and the circus act scupper it in that case?


#634

How can you normalize relations with a communist tyranny who have no interest or incentive to give up power? Raul Castro still runs the show, Diaz-Canel is just a stooge. The easing of sanctions only help the regime in Cuba and do nothing for the Cuban people.

Now is the time to squeeze the bastards as Venezuela is no longer in a position to help them. Without Venezuela, Cuba would have collapsed long ago.


#635

It is plain as day what I am saying.

It looks like you are countering it now.

With regard to Cuba- it is quite obvious. While a Castro is still there, there will be issued.


#636

The Cuban thing is absolutely bizarre from the left.

They all routinely ignore autocratic family dynasties on the Left while lamenting a benign monarchy in the UK.

Fundamentally there needs to be a shift with that family, whether it is from power or acknowledging mistakes from the past, in order for Cuban Americans to accept fully normalised relations.

If Raul doesn’t kick the bucket soon or makes some moves to heal the past then I actually think you are far more likely to see normalised Venezuelan-US relations than Cuba. Of course as you say though, Cuba is propped up by Venezuela, so one would likely follow the other.


#637

the South Koreans wont go against the US

The sunshine policy has been re-enacted


#638

Will the US move the thousands of US marines from their bases now is the question?

I hope they do, well played nonetheless China and Trump.


#639

#640

A Nobel Prize on its way to The Donald.